245,000 now attend private “international” schools in China

From ISC research, via PIE News:

A 64% increase in the five years to 2018 mean the latest figures revealed 245,500 students enrolled in international private K-12 education in China.

Private education expenditure has risen among Chinese families, “a result of a growth in [China-wide] prosperity”, the report noted. It is unclear how this may be affected by a recent economic levelling-off, and the ongoing ‘trade war’ with the US, though some have speculated it is already affecting higher education.

“There is sufficient demand by enough wealthy Chinese parents in China for an international style of education for their children, that the market is expected to expand at pace, regardless of economic influence,” Gaskell added.

“The… market is still in its infancy but this [growth] is a very positive sign, indicative of the success of schools to integrate international and local curricula, and to ensure their practices comply with changes in legislation.”

But the report also nods to perhaps a more important lesson: that “a bicultural educational approach is what a growing number of Chinese families want”.

A Chinese curriculum, integrated with some international modules and language teaching, and “retains local culture and history, while introducing international elements… to prepare children for global higher education” is exactly what many parents desire, the report explained.

Meanwhile, another wrinkle in the Chinese quest for American universities. According to the Wall Street Journal, one of the students in the bribery scandal had to pay $1.2 million for her Yale admission, compared to $250,000 to $400,000 charged to American families.

“Yale Applicant 1” paid $1.2 million to secure her admission to Yale University. The student is 21-year-old Sherry Guo, who moved to Southern California from China to attend high school, her lawyer confirmed.

Ms. Guo had her eye on Columbia University or Oxford University, said her lawyer, James Spertus of Spertus, Landes & Umhofer LLP in Los Angeles.

But Mr. Singer told her she would go to Yale University. It was a sure thing, he said, according to Mr. Spertus. An attorney for Mr. Singer, who has pleaded guilty to four felony charges, including racketeering conspiracy, declined to comment.

Ms. Guo learned English after arriving in California about five years ago, Mr. Spertus said. She attended JSerra Catholic High School in San Juan Capistrano, Calif., south of Los Angeles, starting high school as an older student.

Ms. Guo was “so unfamiliar with how people apply to schools in the U.S.,” Mr. Spertus said. “Rick Singer’s instructions to her didn’t seem as out of place as they would to a student who grew up in the United States and has more of an expectation of free choice.”