Visa Problems At Georgetown Day

This from DC. A teacher’s HB-1 visa expired. She tried for 2 alternates, and was denied.

A Georgetown Prep administrator wrote to parents:

Yesterday we learned that Min Wang, one of our Chinese teachers, had her application for her EB-1A visa (Green Card) denied. Additionally, her application for an O-1A visa was denied.

Min’s application was supported vigorously by us, as well as by the former governor of North Dakota, who vouched strongly for her academic credentials, as she was responsible for helping establish the Chinese program at the University of North Dakota.

From the article:

Wang says she and her immigration attorney were confident she met the criteria. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services disagreed.

She now has a few weeks to return to China.

“I feel the worst about my son because he’s an eighth grader,” Wang said tearing up.

She told her students Tuesday about what was happening.

“I almost wanted to cry myself to be honest with you,” said junior Viraj Prakash.

Prakash and his friend, junior Wes Cooper, were both in the class.

“It was really heartbreaking because you can see how devastated she was,” said Cooper.

They started a petition on change.org titled “Visa For Our Chinese Teacher, Min Wang.” As of Tuesday night, the petition already had several hundred signatures.

“Dr. Wang has been one of the most phenomenal teachers I have had by far,” Prakash said.

The students know it might not help, but they wanted to do something to show support for their teacher.

“It means the whole world to me,” Wang said. “Which means what I have been doing is very meaningful.”

Related: This article is about the shortage of Mandarin teachers in the USA, and how visa issues might exacerbate that.

“It’s a double-edged sword, because on the one hand, we don’t produce Americans with high enough proficiency in Chinese to become teachers,” said Shuhan Wang, head of the Asia’s Society’s Chinese Early Language and Immersion Network, who estimates that well over 80 per cent of current primary and secondary school Chinese language teachers are foreign born.

“On the other hand, then we are tightening the process of allowing teachers legal status to teach here.”

That, Wang said, will limit the ability of the programmes to train American students to attain fluency.