RoundUp!

  1. Three young Chinese teachers tell their stories.
  2. Reddit thread on best schools in Shanghai.
  3. Sociological study of education access in Shanghai.
  4. Ministry of Ed still struggling to make Chinese schools less obsessed with academic outcomes, will try new round of inspections.
  5. Also regs to ban homework in elementary school.
  6. Also kids’ phones banned during school.
  7. Also corporal punishment banned.
  8. Also crackdown on private tutoring companies.

I think #6 and #7 may get traction. I’m skeptical about #4 and #5.

9. Uighur secretary of education gets suspended death sentence from Chinese officials for textbooks authorities didn’t like. Background here.

10. Expose of expensive alternative private schools in China.

Yet, for as promising as this sounds, nearly a year of research has shattered my original impression of alternative education as a potentially superior way to improve children’s lives.

Many of the parents and children I spoke with were not actively choosing alternative education. Rather, their kids had dropped out or were expelled from their original schools. And because alternative schools like the one mentioned above charge 100,000 yuan ($15,200) in yearly tuition, they are not affordable for the average income parent.Nearly a year of research has shattered my original impression of alternative education as a potentially superior way to improve children’s lives.

When I first visited the learning community I mentioned at the beginning of this piece, I was surprised to find that its students spent a significant amount of time playing video games. I never saw the principal or the tutors tell them to stop; sometimes they even joined in.

Harvard, Princeton Profs Fear Class Discussions About China

From Lucy Craymer at WSJ:

The effect of the new national-security law that China imposed on Hong Kong is extending far beyond the territory to American college campuses.

From Princeton:

“We cannot self-censor,” said Rory Truex, an assistant professor who teaches Chinese politics at Princeton. “If we, as a Chinese teaching community, out of fear stop teaching things like Tiananmen or Xinjiang or whatever sensitive topic the Chinese government doesn’t want us talking about, if we cave, then we’ve lost.”

His course will now come with a warning that some of the material might be sensitive and of concern to China’s government, and he said he was introducing blind grading. Students will hand in work bearing a code rather than their name, to prevent any student from being linked to particular views or arguments.

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